How to Comment & Submit

Reading & writing comments
(last updated October 15, 2010)

To read any section, click on its title under the Table of Contents. The number in parentheses shows how many comments have been posted to that section.

Inside each section, view comments by clicking the paragraph bubble OR the comment browser row. The floating comment browser may be moved and resized by width, and it contains both general and paragraph-level comments.

To see a running transcript of comments, organized by section or author, click on the appropriate button at the top. Click “go to thread” to read any comment in context.

To write a comment, click the paragraph bubble OR comment browser. You may respond to a specific paragraph or make a general comment about the section at large. Include your real name (that means you, Herman!) and email address (which other readers will not see). Adding your personal web address is optional, but the link may help other readers to learn more about you. You also may include web links in the body of your comment. Remember to click the “Submit Comment” button.

Comments are welcome from Oct 11th to Nov 11th, 2010 and will be moderated. Your first posting may be delayed several hours due to screening. The editor may suggest revisions for length, content, or clarity, and also reserves the right to decline, hold, or remove any comment, and will not accept anonymous responses. By submitting a comment, you are freely contributing your words to this site, and possibly to a future publication on this topic.

How to automatically receive updates from the site with RSS:
RSS stands for “Really Simple Syndication,” which is a standardized format for automatically receiving notifications when content has been added to a website. In the bottom-right corner of the home page, click on “Entries RSS” to receive updates on new essays, and/or “Comments RSS” on new comments.

Or for updates on a specific comment, click the orange RSS symbol in the floating comment browser.

After clicking, your web browser will display an address beginning with the term “feed://. . .”  Copy and paste the feed address into your personal RSS reader account (such as Google Reader and many others), and you will receive notifications when new content is posted.

How to submit an essay for consideration by the editor:
Do you have a contribution you’d like to share? We welcome your essays on the process of researching, writing, and publishing book-length historical works in the digital era. Our commenting window is open from Oct 11th to Nov 11th, 2010. Email your idea or draft essay to the editor, Kristen Nawrotzki, at this address:

kdnawrotzki [at] gmail [dot] com

Currently, most essays run from 1,500 to 5,000 words, though we have no length requirement. We use in-line citations (for technical reasons), and web links and embedded graphics are also welcome. The editor may suggest revisions for length, content, or clarity, and also reserves the right to decline, hold, or remove any essay, and will not accept anonymous contributions. By submitting an essay, you are freely contributing your words to this site, and possibly to a future publication on this topic. Contributors will be asked to share their work under the Creative Commons license for this site

Future publication plans:
If this interactive website generates meaningful discussion, we may republish the content in a different form in the near future, possibly using Anthologize from the Center for History and New Media.

How to cite our writing:
A sample citation appears at the bottom of essay and open-response sections of this website. Every essay (and comment) can be referenced by a permalink, meaning a permanent URL web address, which should be included in a scholarly citation.

Why we use Creative Commons licensing:
To encourage open circulation of our scholarly writing, our content is shared under a Creative Commons license, a non-exclusive agreement that allows anyone to copy, adapt, and distribute it under the same terms for non-commercial purposes, with the original source appropriately cited. As authors and educators, Creative Commons protects our works while making them more publicly accessible than conventional copyright agreements.

Creative Commons License This web page from Writing History: How Historians Research, Write, and Publish in the Digital Age is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 License. You may freely distribute this work under the same terms for non-commercial purposes, but you must cite where it originally appeared.

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