– Have changes in print and digital publishing influenced how you read or write?


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We have witnessed many changes in print and digital publishing over the past several years. Have any of these influenced how you read — or write — about history? Use the commenting feature to share your perspective.
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How to cite this page:
“Have changes in print and digital publishing influenced how you read or write?” Writing History: How Historians Research, Write, and Publish in the Digital Age, October 6, 2010, http://writinghistory.wp.trincoll.edu/2010/10/06/changes/.
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Creative Commons License This web page from Writing History: How Historians Research, Write, and Publish in the Digital Age is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 License. You may freely distribute this work under the same terms for non-commercial purposes, but you must include a citation similar to the one above.

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2 Responses to “– Have changes in print and digital publishing influenced how you read or write?”

Sherman Dorn says:

Apart from my blogging? ;) Since I’m among the minority of historians in a tenured job, I have the luxury of taking risks for things like blogging or editing an online journal. Those who have jumped into such experiments without that security have my absolute admiration.

One of the more recent conversations I have been following has been the nature of peer review and the crisis in academic publishing. Where the book is the coin of the realm, academic presses have enormous credential value, in large part from the presumption of quality review. Some commercial presses also gain credibility from peer review, but not all. The economic pressures on academic presses, along with other disciplines’ parallels/alternatives to pre-publication review (think arXiv.org), is making me wonder what’s important for me to follow and where to engage.

Natalia Mehlman Petrzela says:

Digital technology has absolutely changed the way I read, write, and TEACH. One of the benefits of databases like JStor and the History Cooperative (and Blackboard or Courseworks on the other side) is how easy it is to do preliminary research, and to assign students readings without the hassle and expense of a course reader and book ordering. The same applies to research (for myself and my projects) in light of amazing documentary collections such as those culled by the Alexander Street Press, or by specific physical archives such as California’s in Sacramento, which have made huge strides in digitizing their holdings. However, I do have my questions as to the long-term impact of this inexorable trend. It has become so easy to rely on the growing amounts of digital archives that it is becoming easier not to trouble oneself with making a physical trip to the library… this worries me in that sources that are not digitized risk total obscurity!